Prev | Next (1 of 18) Back to thumbnails

  • Shokran

    graphite and colored pencil on paper 11 x 14 inches 2007

  • Shokran (detail)

    graphite and colored pencil on paper

  • Shokran (detail)

    graphite on paper

  • Garden Walk

    graphite on paper 8 x 23 inches 2007

  • Whither Thou Goest

    graphite, colored pencil and masking tape on paper 23 x 18 inches 2007

  • Whither Thour Goest (detail)

    graphite and colored pencil on paper

  • Wear

    graphite, colored pencil and masking tape on paper 18 x 28 inches 2007

  • Wear (detail)

    graphite, colored pencil and masking tape on paper

  • Unknown

    graphite on paper 11 x 14 inches 2007

  • Pursuit of Virtue Series No. 2

    graphite and colored pencil on paper 28 x 18 inches 2007

  • Pursuit of Virtue Series No. 2 (detail)

    graphite and colored pencil on paper

  • Pursuit of Virtue Series No. 2 (detail)

    graphite and colored pencil on paper

  • Momento Mori

    graphite and masking tape on paper 11 x 14 inches 2007

  • Momento Mori (detail)

    graphite and masking tape on paper

  • Twice Removed

    Graphite, color photograph and masking tape on paper 28 x 40 inches 2007

  • Twice Removed (detail)

    Graphite, color photograph and masking tape on paper

  • Twice Removed (detail)

    Graphite, color photograph and masking tape on paper

  • Overcome

    Graphite, colored pencil and masking tape on paper 11 x 14 inches 2007

      Susan Sontag states, “To take a photograph is to participate in another person’s mortality, vulnerability, mutability.  Precisely by slicing out this moment and freezing it, all photographs testify to time’s relentless melt.”  This concept inspires and informs my interest in utilizing the snapshot for its historical documentation of moments in time.  Susan Sontag’s reference to photographs being momento mori focuses my work while I investigate the mysticism and myth of totem poles, faith, metaphysics, mortality, palliative care, the surgical process, and our interest in the snapshot photograph.  Watching friends and family endure troublesome times enables me to examine our vitality to traverse despair during arduous circumstances.  Another way to state this is the leeway between fragility and malleability.  I communicate through specific circumstances how individuals have overcome battles with isolation, fragility, sickness, deterioration, decline, and death.  This is accomplished through the media of finely crafted pencil drawings because the pencil is not too distant from the scalpel, and meticulous, incisive mark making is not too unlike surgery.